2011 Sessions

UBC Innovators in the Dissemination of Research – Showcase and Exchange

Speaker: Prof. Anne-Marie Nicol on Wash With Care

Description:

Wash With Care is a community-based, collaborative research project aimed at raising awareness about pesticide safety in farming communities in BC’s Lower Mainland. The project uses a series of Public Service Announcement videos to communicate information about how to safely launder pesticide-contaminated clothing. Because the primary audience for this information is Punjabi-speaking women, the videos feature a specially-choreographed bhangra dance and well-known Punjabi actors to disseminate their message.

Speaker Bio:

Assistant Professor, UBC School of Environmental Health

 

Speaker: Dr. Paul Evans on Asia Pacific Memo

Description:

The Institute has been running an experiment with a twice-weekly e-publication that aims to make sophisticated academic research widely accessible (www.asiapacificmemo.ca). It includes short text version and video interviews.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Paul Evans is the Director of the Institute of Asian Research and Professor, Liu Institute for Global Issues

 

Speaker: Dr. Rosie Redfield on Open Science and her own Open Science blog RRResearch

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Rosemary (Rosie) Redfield is a Professor in the Department of Zoology and heads the Redfield Lab.

 

Speaker: Dr. Erin Michalak on Stigma and Biopolar Disorder: Moving Knowledge to Action

Archived Presentation available here

Description:

Professor Michalak will describe her novel knowledge translation strategy involving the use of drama to share information about mental illness stigma with people with BD and their clinicians.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Erin Michalak is an Assistant Professor in the Mood Disorders Centre in the Department of Psychiatry of the University of British Columbia and the Crestbd team leader.

 

Speaker: Dr. Harry Brumer on Cazypedia

Archived Presentation available here

Description:

Dr. Harry Brumer will discuss the development of his community-driven resource to assemble a comprehensive encyclopedia “CAZymes,” the carbohydrate-active enzymes and binding proteins involved in the synthesis and degradation of complex carbohydrates.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Harry Brumer is a Professor in the Michael Smith Laboratories and Department of Chemistry at UBC and holds a partial appointment as Professor in the School of Biotechnology at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden.

 

Speaker: Dr. Wyeth W. Wasserman and Dimas Yusuf on Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe) ) – Winner of the 2011 Innovative Dissemination of Research Award

Archived Presentation available here

Description:

The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), is an online open access encyclopedia that houses more than 800 articles about transcription factor genes. Transcription factors are a special class of genes that control when genes are turned on or off. They are critical to learning how to use embryonic stem cells for the treatment of human disease. The TFe, which is a wiki-based software system, encourages experts to create short summaries of the known information about each transcription factor. The summaries are comprised of text, 3D models, and word clouds.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Wasserman is a Professor in the Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia and Senior Scientist, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Child and Family Research Institute.

Dimas Yusuf is a third-year UBC Medical Student.

Wikis, Blogs, and Websites: Leveraging Open Source Software to Support Teaching and Learning, Scholarly Communication, and Academic Collaboration

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Will Engle, Novak Rogic, and Scott McMillan

Description:

UBC has developed a rich web publishing framework that enables open sharing and republishing for scholarly communication, academic collaboration, and teaching and learning applications. Powered by WordPress and MediaWiki open source software, UBC Blogs, UBC CMS, and the UCB Wiki serve close to 10,000 users and significantly contribute to UBC’s rich publishing landscape. This session will explore the technical, governance, support, and informational architecture aspects of this DIY framework. It will also examine how UBC faculty, students and staff are using the framework to advance teaching and learning, open communication, and scholarly collaboration.

Speaker Bio:

Will Engle is a MLIS student at UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. He works for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology at UBC, where he is focused on creating organizational and structural support for the UBC Wiki.

Novak Rogic is UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology’s Web Strategist. He leads web projects that emphasize content sharing and republishing.

Scott McMillan administers and does backend development for UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Technology’s CMS, Blogs and Wiki projects. He also assists in testing out new technologies for CTLT.

From Community Engagement to Global Access: Bringing UBC’s Knowledge to the World with cIRcle

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Hilde Colenbrander, Tara Stephens, and Julia Thompson

Description:

Want to disseminate your research locally, nationally, globally? Interested in getting information dissemination support for materials from your community based projects? Find out how to share your research results or teaching materials easily via cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository (https://circle.ubc.ca/). cIRcle provides open and permanent access to the intellectual output of the UBC community and its partners, including articles, conference and workshop papers, theses and dissertations, exemplary undergraduate student research, technical reports and working papers, books, datasets, learning objects, multimedia and audio-visual materials including podcasts, webcasts and more.
A wonderful example of a project that involved many members of our community and beyond is the cIRcle Olympics Project (October 2009—April 2011). This was a unique effort to gather, showcase and preserve UBC’s intellectual output related to the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Over the course of 18 months, material was gathered in a variety of formats on a range of Olympics related topics from ethics and sustainability to inclusivity and social responsibility. The result is a unique collection of valuable material that receives tens of thousands of views and downloads from around the world and serves as an important record of UBC’s significant contribution to the Vancouver Olympic Legacy.

Speaker Bio:

Hilde Colenbrander has coordinated the cIRcle project since its inception as a small pilot project in the spring of 2007. cIRcle became a full service of the UBC Library in 2009, and the database currently contains approximately 36,700 items. Hilde has worked in the UBC Library system in many capacities, including as data librarian, distance education services librarian, acting head of the science and engineering library, and social sciences reference librarian. She has long been an advocate for open access to scholarly publications. She serves on the Provost’s Scholarly Communications Steering Committee, and has presented numerous papers on open access, on author rights, and on cIRcle.

Tara Stephens first joined cIRcle as the 2010 Olympics and Paralympics Project Librarian in October 2009 working with the UBC community and its partners to capture and disseminate UBC’s unique contribution to the 2010 Winter Games legacy. In her current role as the cIRcle Librarian, Tara manages multiple projects that support the open access and community engagement initiatives of the repository, the Library and the university as a whole. Many of these projects served as examples of successful collaborative models for her poster at the recent the World Library and Information Congress (IFLA).

Julia Thompson has been providing operational support to the cIRcle Coordinator and assistance in the acquisition of cIRcle materials from the UBC community (faculty, staff, and students) since 2008. She instructs new cIRcle users on how to deposit their materials to cIRcle while ensuring compliance with cIRcle policies. Her administrative and technical cIRcle support helps the UBC community to capture, preserve, and showcase their materials to the global scholarly community and beyond.

Investigations into Open Peer Review Models

Speaker: Bonnie Wen

Description:

Bonnie Wen will describe several experiments with Open Peer Review models from several major publishers.

Speaker Bio:

Bonnie Wen is a full-time MLIS student and part-time student librarian in the Education Library at UBC. Rather than picturing herself as a traditional librarian, she has been trying to position her future career as an information architect. Before entering into the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies at UBC, she had been teaching in China for three years. In 2009, she was conferred a Masters’ Degree of Education at UBC.

Copyright and the Classroom: Open Scholarship Solutions to Support Classroom Use of Material

Speaker: Joy Kirchner

Description:

The aim of these sessions is to provide educators and researchers with an understanding of use permissions for copyrighted materials and licensed material for classroom, research and instructional use; an understanding of author’s rights in this context and an explanation of how open access and other open scholarship models can be a solution for your classroom needs.

Speaker Bio:

Joy Kirchner is the Scholarly Communications Coordinator at University of British Columbia, a role which involves identifying recommended and sustainable service models to support scholarly communication activities on the campus. Joy is a member of UBC’s Copyright Advisory Group and a member of the Provost’s campus-wide Scholarly Communications Steering Committee. She is the point person for open access, copyright and author rights queries on campus and is responsible for formalized discussion and education of these issues with faculty, research and publishing constituencies on the UBC campus. Joy writes and presents widely on author rights, copyright and open access. She also sits on a number of publishing advisory boards, is a faculty member with the ARL/ACRL/ Institute for Scholarly Communication and is a Visiting Program Officer for the Association of College and Research Libraries(ACRL) where she provides coordination for ACRL’s Scholarly Communications 101 workshop program.

Open Source Solutions for Archival Collections

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Evelyn McLellan and Sarah Romkey

Description:

Developments in open source software have made it easier for archival institutions to provide access to their holding and to preserve born-digital records. Evelyn McLellan, Systems Archivist for Vancouver-based software developer Artefactual Systems, will describe open-source software developed by Artefactual for use in libraries and archives. Sarah Romkey, Rare Books and Special Collections Archivist for UBC Library will provide a description of projects being undertaken at UBC Library to use this software to better preserve and provide access to archival holdings.

Speaker Bio:

Evelyn McLellan is a graduate of the University of British Columbia’s Master of Archival Studies program (1997) and has over 10 years experience as an archivist and records information analyst at a number of organizations including the City of Vancouver Archives and the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. As Systems analyst and consultant on Artefactual’s digital preservation projects, Evelyn provides end-user support, user documentation, quality assurance testing and system requirements management for Artefactual’s Archivematica project.

Sarah Romkey graduated from University of British Columbia’s joint Masters in Archival Studies and Masters in Library and Information Studies program in 2008. She has since that time worked in UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections division initially as the Librarian and Archivist for the Chung Collection and since 2009 as the Rare Books and Special Collections Archivist. Sarah is responsible in this role for acquiring, providing access to and preserving the archives of individuals and organizations external to UBC.

Bill C-11 – Beyond Digital Locks

Speaker: Martha Rans

Description:

Find out more about the proposed new copyright legislation. A brief overview will be followed with a question & answer. Martha will offer her on the ground experience acting for artists and educators on a variety of copyright issues.

Speaker Bio:

Martha Rans is Vancouver Project Lead for Creative Commons Canada. A true believer in giving to the community and a passionate advocate for the arts, Martha Rans has been practicing law since 1995 and has acted for artists in all disciplines including painting, photography, architecture, sculpture, textile, film and video, new media, animation, website and graphic design, theatre and dance. She regularly advises arts-related and other not-for-profit organizations on a wide range of legal issues including intellectual property, employment, labour, health & safety and privacy. In 2005, she created the Artists’ Legal Outreach: run entirely by volunteers, it ensures access to legal information and advice for artists and arts organizations. She is the Vancouver Project Lead for Creative Commons Canada, a sessional professor at Emily Car University and YWCA Women of Distinction Award nominee.

User Rights in Education – Comparative Copyright Laws in US & Canada

Speaker: Dwayne K. Buttler

Description:

Dwayne will identify the key public policy goals copyright purportedly remedies, albeit sometimes most unhelpfully, and then compare some commonalities and differences between US and Canadian approaches and, in particular, serious limitations plaguing “fair dealing” regimes, that in the speaker’s view, is a rigid adherence to statutory constructs and precisely identified allowances or limitations that offers far less flexibility than the US fair use doctrine for making creative decisions in novel situations.

Speaker Bio:

Dwayne K. Buttler, JD serves as the first Evelyn J. Schneider Endowed Chair for Scholarly Communication at the University of Louisville and holds a faculty appointment as a Professor in University Libraries. Much of his work focuses on the complex interrelationship of copyright law, licensing, and activities at the core of the university and library mission—teaching, learning, and scholarly communication. Professor Buttler earned a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from the Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis and holds a BA in Telecommunications from Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis. Dwayne teaches mass communication law at UofL and leads numerous invited presentations on copyright and scholarly communication for administrators, faculty, librarians, and scholars in the library and the higher education communities.

Getting Started with Creative Commons

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Duncan McHugh

Description:

Using copyrighted material is fraught with challenges. Creative Commons offers an alternative to copyright. This session will introduce Creative Commons, its pros and cons, and show users how to begin using Creative Commons materials right away, both as creators and users of media

Speaker Bio:

Duncan McHugh is the Multimedia Developer at UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems, where he teaches and supports new media technology. He has led the faculty’s Creative Commons initiatives since 2006. He also volunteers at CiTR 101.9FM, UBC’s radio station.

KEYNOTE – Opening the Possibilities of the Internet: OpenMedia.ca’s Transformative Campaigns and the University Community

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Reilly Yeo

Description:

OpenMedia.ca has changed the face of online activism in Canada and, as a result, changed the conversation about what the Internet means for society. Managing Director Reilly Yeo will describe OpenMedia.ca’s efforts to democratize the digital policy-making process, and explain why universities should pay attention.OpenMedia.ca is a non-partisan, non-profit organization working to advance and support an open and innovative communications system in Canada. OpenMedia.ca unites citizen voices in the digital policy-making process and works to open the Internet’s transformative potential to everyone. Our primary goal is to increase informed participation in Internet governance.

COPPUL Sponsored Event

Speaker Bio:

Reilly Yeo is the Managing Director of OpenMedia.ca. Reilly is an organizer, facilitator and online communications consultant with ten years experience in the not-for-profit sector. She has a diverse professional background that includes work with Amnesty International, The Walrus magazine, and the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. Reilly led the organizing team for the first Vancouver ChangeCamp, and facilitated cross-country in-person and online dialogues with the Canada’s World project at the SFU Centre for Dialogue. Reilly has an MA in comparative politics from McGill University and is currently combining her not-for-profit work with an academic career in literature and political theory. She is a specialist in online communications on complex issues.