2011 Sessions

Opening Up Worldwide Access to Key BC Historical Documents: Chinese Canadian Stories, BC Historical Newspapers and More

Mike Conroy: Archived Presentation available here

Denise Fong: Archived Presentation available here

Mimi Lam: Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Mike Conroy, Denise Fong, and Mimi Lam

Description:

UBC Library’s Digitization program has opened up global access to many historical documents. The digitization team will showcase and demonstrate new and upcoming digital projects from the UBC Library Digital Initiatives Unit. Projects highlighted include British Columbia Historical Newspapers Project; BC History Digitization Program; the BC Digitization Coalition and the Community Historical Recognition Program – Chinese Canadian Stories.

Speaker Bio:

Mike Conroy is a graduate of UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies and has been involved in digitization efforts since 2009. Most recently Mike was project manager for the BC Historical Newspapers Project in his role as Digitization Projects Analyst, UBC Library.

Denise Fong joined the Library as the CHRP project manager in the summer of 2010. Now working under the umbrella of Digital Initiatives, she is responsible for managing the two-year interdisciplinary project Chinese Canadian Stories lead by UBC Library, SFU Library and over 20 other UBC departments and community partners. Before she joined the UBC CHRP team, Denise was the coordinator for another CHRP project From C to C produced by the SFU Teaching & Learning Centre about the Chinese Head Tax. CHRP stands for Community Historical Recognition Program, a grant offered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to fund projects that recognizes and commemorates the historical experiences of ethnic communities affected by historical wartime measures and immigration restrictions.

Mimi Lam joined the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre as Community Digitization Librarian in 2010. She is a graduate of the School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS) at UBC and has worked in various special libraries before joining UBC Library. Prior to IKBLC, Mimi was a Digital Librarian at the Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre. She has extensive experience working on digitization projects and managing digital collections.

Blogging as Cataloging: Visibility, Accessibility and Possibility in Special Art Libraries

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Ksenia Cheinman

Description:

Ksenia will explore the value of using blogs as a cataloging mechanism to enhance digital objects, records in Art libraries.

Speaker Bio:

Ksenia Cheinman is a first year student at UBC’s School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. She holds a BA in Art History and French and an MA in French. As a career path, Ksenia is interested in academic librarianship, art librarianship and innovative outreach strategies. Her personal research focuses on the unique role of special libraries in arts and humanities.

Why Springer Moved to OA?

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Wim van der Stelt

Speaker Bio:

Wim van der Stelt started his career in 1987 with a major chain of scientific booksellers (Wolters Kluwer Academic Book Shops) in the Netherlands, developing the direct marketing activities. He followed this up with a stint in marketing at Samson H.D. Tjeenk Willink from 1991 to 1996. He then rejoined Wolters Kluwer as Editorial Director for the Dutch-language legal and tax publishing activities and then moving on to the company’s pan-European tax and legal portal initiatives. In 2004, he joined Springer, one of the world’s leading scientific publishing houses, as VP Global Marketing. Since 2007, he has been EVP, Corporate Strategy and Business Development at Springer Science+Business Media, a position which includes the management and further development of all of Springer’s open access initiatives.

Leading the next frontier of OA: Filtering, Aggregating, and Evaluating Research Content

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Jennifer Lin

Speaker Bio:

Jennifer Lin is the product manager at Public Library of Science. She is passionate about open access and its political and social impacts. As a former business consultant, she worked with Fortune 500 companies as well as governments to develop and deploy new products and services. Jennifer received her Ph.D. in political philosophy and has served as an instructor at Johns Hopkins University.

KEYNOTE – “What Problems Are We Trying To Fix?”

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Dr. David Rosenthal

Description:

Open access is changing the system of research communication. But can it solve the problems that beset the system? What exactly are these problems? Drawing on the discussions at a recent workshop on the “Future of Research Communication”, Dr. Rosenthal looks at the dysfunctions of the system from the viewpoints of participants such as researchers, libraries, publishers, software developers and the general public.

COPPUL Sponsored Event * Event is live webcasted to COPPUL Libraries

Speaker Bio:

Dr. David S. H. Rosenthal is the Chief Scientist of the LOCKSS Program at the Stanford University Libraries. He has been working on engineering aspects of digital preservation systems, including threats, defenses and economics since 1998. Before that his career included Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems, and Chief Scientist and employee #4 at Nvidia.

Transitioning a journal to an open access business model: a Canadian perspective

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Lesley Andres and Sharon Hu

Description:

Lesley will describe her experience moving her journal from a traditional business model to an OA model and why she did it.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Lesley Andres is a Professor, in the Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia and Editor of Canadian Journal of Higher Education. Chair in International Comparative Studies in Social Sciences DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst/German Academic Exchange Service Bremen International School of Social Sciences University of Bremen, Germany, and Fellow, Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg (Institute for Advanced Study), Delmenhorst, Germany (April–October 2010). Her research and teaching interests include the sociology of education, foundations of higher education, issues of inequality and access, transition across the life course research, and quantitative and qualitative research methods. Her research focuses on the intersecting domains of participation in post-secondary education, equality of educational opportunity, and the relationship between institutional structures and individuals as agents from an international comparative perspective. Her main research projects are the Paths on Life’s Way study, a 22-year longitudinal study of BC young adults and a related comparison with the Australian Life Patterns longitudinal study.

Sharon Hu is the journal manager for the Canadian Journal of Higher Education. She manages the submission of manuscripts and reviews and handles communications among editors, authors and reviewers, as well as produces manuscript galleys for publication.

KEYNOTE: Opening Up Education – Creative Alternatives to Access Copyright

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Paul Stacey

Description:

As institutions opt out of the Access Copyright Post-Secondary Educational Institutional Tariff creative alternatives to sourcing educational content and resources need to be found. Join Paul in this interactive keynote exploration of creative alternatives including fair dealing, Open Access research publishing, Open Educational Resources, open textbooks, open licenses, and open educational practices. While acknowledging the challenges opting out of Access Copyright creates this session will outline the opportunities this creates to do things differently and to fully utilize digital alternatives. Within a broad array of creative alternatives Paul will focus in on the unique opportunities associated with Open Educational Resources (OER). BC and international OER development efforts will be highlighted, sample OER resources shown, and the implications for institutions, faculty and students explored. This session will conclude with interactive discussion around the implications opening up education has for UBC and higher education in general as we collectively transition into this new future.

Speaker Bio:

Paul Stacey is the Director of Communications, Stakeholder and Academic Relations at BCcampus. Headquartered in Vancouver, BCcampus provides services in support of educational technology and online learning to British Columbia’s 25 public colleges and universities, their students, faculty and administrators. With funding support from the BC Ministry of Advanced Education BCcampus has been providing online curricula development grants to BC post secondary institutions since 2003. The curricula produced through these grants have the dual purpose of producing academic for credit offerings to students and creating curricula freely available for sharing and reuse by others as Open Educational Resources.

A Course on Reproducible Research in Computational and Data Science: What should it be?

Speaker: Dr. Ian Mitchell and Dr. Dhavide Aruliah

Description:

Computers have become a vital tool in all areas of research. Unfortunately the software and data that enables this research is too often developed and managed in a haphazard fashion. Reproducible research is the idea that research contributions in the computational and data sciences involve not only publication of an article in an academic venue, but also release of sufficient components of the software and data such that the results claimed in the publication can be reproduced and extended by other scientists. Reproducible research therefore is a cornerstone of open access to scientific scholarship. Starting in January 2012, the presenters will be offering a pilot course on tools, techniques & strategies to improve the reproducibility of scientific research of a computational or data-intensive nature. The goals of this panel discussion are to inform the UBC community of our intentions with this course and to solicit feedback from the community on what the course should contain. Topics may include: tools and best-practices for software management; data provenance, anonymization and maintenance; intellectual property issues; avenues for effective dissemination; case studies (both good and bad).

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Ian M. Mitchell completed his doctoral work in engineering at Stanford University in 2002, spent a year as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California at Berkeley and is now an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia. His research interests include scientific computing, cyber-physical systems, formal methods for verification robotics and reproducible research.

Dr. Dhavide Aruliah obtained his doctorate from the Department of Computer Science at UBC in 2001. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Fields Institute for Research in the Mathematical Sciences and at the University of Western Ontario. He has been at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (Oshawa, ON) since 2004 where he is currently an associate professor in the Faculty of Science. At present, he is a Visiting Professor in Department of Computer Science at UBC. His research interests are in scientific computing, specifically in computational inverse problems and the numerical solution of PDEs. He is also interested in software design for scientific computing, specifically in how scientists actually use scientific software

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Archived Presentation available here

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Description:

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