2012 Sessions

Open access: effects and consequences in the management of scientific discourse.

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker:Dieter Stein

Description:

Open access has a number of effects on scientific discourse, some of which are only now becoming visible. A prominent effect of open access is the abolishment of the border between research inputs and outputs, transforming the process of scholarly inquiry. The creation and availability of data and finished research products tend to be more and more collapsed into one permanent flow of information, without fixed boundaries between a dynamic research process and a static notion of “publication.” Enabling researchers to permanently and openly access data and results at all processing stages changes the interactivity, the participational structure and the nature of scientific enquiry. In addition to changing the function and the nature of what constitutes “a publication,” and apart from the change in financial underpinnings of a new science, there are ripple effects for what is “excellent” research and for research evaluation. New notions of ownership and copyright adapted to a largely decommodified science discourse need to evolve. Roles of librarians will need to be redefined. The status of the book will be redefined. It is argued that these effects are embedded in, and part of, a new way of reorganizing cultural knowledge and its preservation.

Speaker Bio:

Stein was President of the International Society of Historical Linguistics, and is currently President of the International Language and Law Society. He is also editor-in-chief of the Linguistic Society of America’s digital publication portal eLanguage. He was the organizer and conference director of “Berlin 6,” the Max Planck Open Access conference at Duesseldorf. Current research areas include language of the law, computer-mediated communication and language development.

Dieter Stein has taught at various universities in the United States, Canada, Spain and Italy, was an invited scholar at UCLA, Berkeley and UBC. His publications cover a broad range of topics ranging from the theory of linguistic change, to language and communication in the Internet, the theory of genre and the language of law.

Physical Prototyping at UBC and Open Robotics Demo

Speaker: Jon Nakane

Description:

Prototyping tools are available on campus for students looking to fabricate their ideas into physical objects. On display will be physical prototypes from UBC Engineering Physics and other local groups making use of waterjet cutters, 3d printers, laser cutters and other tools to put together physical prototypes for academic courses, capstone projects and extracurricular teams.

Speaker Bio:

Jon Nakane has been at UBC for more than 15 years – as an undergrad and grad student, and currently as the Lab Director of the Engineering Physics Project Lab at UBC. He supervises senior undergrad engineering projects involving electronics, mechanical and software solutions. He has access to some of the more interesting prototyping tools on campus, and has sponsored extra-curricular competition teams (UBC Snowstar, Electric Racing Team, UBC Rapid).

Adventures in Open Science Advocacy

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: David Ng

Description:

Ng will discuss his experiences in getting science topics into the general public’s consciousness. This includes a number of open projects that primarily rely on crowd-sourcing, involving attempts at hosting puzzles, determining the “truth,” ranking Candy, and his more recent grand crowdsourcing experiment, The Phylomon Project. He will attempt to provide some advice on such ventures and show the merits of an open culture.

Speaker Bio:

David Ng is a geneticist, science literacy academic, writer and faculty member based at UBC’s Michael Smith Laboratories. You can find out more about his dabblings at http://thisishowitalkscience.tumblr.com; follow him on Twitter @ng_dave.

#arseniclife, social media and open science

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Dr. Rosie Redfield

Description:

In late 2010 NASA-funded scientists claimed to have overturned a basic principle of biochemistry by finding bacteria that used arsenic in place of phosphorus. Science blogs and Twitter rapidly spread the word that the data were unreliable and the findings contrary to the known chemistry of these elements. These social media interactions led to an open-science collaboration that overturned the claims. The talk will consider the conflicting effects of secrecy and openness in such processes as peer review and pre-publication embargoes.

Speaker Bio:

Rosie Redfield is a UBC microbiologist and Professor of Zoology; her RRResearch blog has highlighted open science in action since 2006. Her initial critique of NASA’s claimed arsenic-using bacteria led to a series of open-science experiments culminating in refutation of the results. She’s a firm believer in peer review, but thinks the publication embargo system should go.

The Sea Around US

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Dr. Daniel Pauly

Description:

Daniel Pauly and his team will showcase their highly acclaimed The Sea Around Us project. This openly available research portal examines the impact of fisheries on marine ecosystems of the world, and offers mitigating solutions to a range of stakeholders through Analyses & Visualizations, articles in peer-reviewed journals and other media (News & About) that is posted on the portal along with other data sources the team has developed. These include Exclusive Economic Zones, Large Marine Ecosystems, the High Seas and other spatial scales, global maps and summaries. Pauly, the 2012 recipient of the Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest and 2012 winner of UBC’s Innovative Dissemination of Research Award, will discuss his motivation for opening up access to his research worldwide as represented by such projects as The Sea Around Us.

Speaker Bio:

Daniel Pauly was born in France, raised in Switzerland and studied in Germany. He holds a doctorate in fisheries biology from the University of Kiel. He made his first intercontinental trip in 1971 (from Germany to Ghana for field work for his master’s degree); since then, he has had the privilege of experiencing a multitude of countries, cultures and modes of exploiting aquatic ecosystems. This perspective allowed him to develop tools for managing data-sparse fisheries.In 1994, Pauly became a Professor at the UBC Fisheries Centre, and was its Director from 2003 to 2008. In 1999, he founded a large research project devoted to identifying and quantifying global fisheries trends, funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts (it was called The Sea Around Us after Rachel Carson’s 1951 bestselling book). Pauly is also co-founder of Fishbase.org, the online encyclopedia of more than 30,000 fish species, and he has helped develop the widely used Ecopath modelling software. He is the author or co-author of more than 500 scientific and other articles, books and chapters on fish, fisheries and related topics. Two new books will be published in 2010: Five Easy Pieces: Reporting on the Global Impact of Fisheries and Gasping Fish and Panting Squids: Oxygen, Temperature and the Growth of Water-Breathing Animals. In May 2012, Pauly accepted the Nierenberg Prize, given annually by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography for outstanding contributions to science in the public interest. He is the Principal Investigator of The Sea Around Us project.

First Nations and Open Access

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Jason Woolman and Larissa Grant

Description:

Join Larissa Grant and Jason Woolman from the Musqueam Indian Band in a discussion on what open access means in the context of First Nations peoples. How can we make items truly open access if there are cultural sensitivities? Grant and Woolman will give an overview of some of the key considerations for making items open access, and highlight a recent development project at UBC’s Museum of Anthropology that gives researchers access to thousands of never-before-seen items.

Speaker Bio:

Jason Woolmanis the Senior Archivist for the Musqueam First Nation in Vancouver, where he has worked since 2008. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies from Northern Michigan University; 2009 he received his Master of Archival Studies degree with a concentration in First Nations Studies from UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. His research interests include orality and material culture as traditional forms of record-keeping, the role of cultural sensitivity in archives, and language preservation.

Larissa Grant is a member of the Musqueam First Nation. She is a graduate of the Library and Information Technology Program at Langara College. She is culturally grounded by the teachings of her parents, grandparents and extended family. She is employed by the Musqueam First Nation as a Research Librarian and is a member of the Community Planning Team. Her background and cultural education complement the effort to ensure that the community plan is sustainable.

Open Scholar Awards at UBC: Increase the Impact of your Research

Archived Presentation available here

Speakers: Hilde Colenbrander, Joy Kirchner, Tara Stephens and student presenters

Description:

UBC scholars who make their work openly accessible are now eligible for two campus awards. The GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award is open to graduate students at UBC Vancouver who submit exemplary non-thesis graduate manuscripts or projects to cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository. The award is based on a lottery held twice a year in October and April. The UBC Library Innovative Dissemination of Research Award honours UBC faculty, staff and students who are expanding the boundaries of research through the creative use of new tools and technologies that enhance the research findings being disseminated. Come to this session to find out how these exciting awards can help you increase the impact of your research.

Speaker Bios:

Hilde Colenbrander is the cIRcle Coordinator at the UBC Library. cIRcle is a digital repository which showcases UBC’s intellectual output by making it openly accessible on the web. The cIRcle database currently contains over 42,000 full text, video and audio items. Hilde has worked in the UBC Library system in many capacities, including as data librarian, distance education services librarian, acting head of the science and engineering library, and liaison librarian. She has long been a strong advocate for open access to scholarly publications and research data. She serves on the UBC Provost’s Scholarly Communications Steering Committee, and has presented numerous papers on open access, on copyright and author rights, and on cIRcle. cIRcle is currently ranked the Number 1 institutional repository in Canada.

Joy Kirchner is the Scholarly Communications Coordinator at University of British Columbia where she oversees the University’s Scholarly Communications & Copyright Office based in the UBC Library.  Her role involves coordinating the University’s copyright education services, identifying recommended and sustainable service models to support scholarly communication activities on the campus and coordinating formalized discussion and education of these issues with faculty, students, research and publishing constituencies on the UBC campus. Joy has also been instrumental in working with faculty to host their open access journals through the Library’s open access journal hosting program; she was involved in the implementation and content recruitment of the Library’s institutional repository, and she was instrumental in establishing the Provost’s Scholarly Communications Steering Committee and associated working groups where she sits as a key member of the Committee.  Joy is also chair of UBC’s Copyright Advisory Committee and working groups. She is also a faculty member with the ARL/ACRL Institute for Scholarly Communication, she assists with the coordination and program development of ACRL’s Scholarly Communications Road Show program, and she is a Fellow with ARL’s Research Library Leadership Fellows executive program (RLLF).

Tara Stephens first joined cIRcle as the 2010 Olympics and Paralympics Project Librarian in October 2009 working with the UBC community and its partners to capture and disseminate the university’s unique contribution to the 2010 Winter Games legacy. In her current role as the cIRcle Digital Repository Librarian, Tara manages multiple projects that support the open access and community engagement initiatives of the repository, the Library and the university as a whole.

An Overview of Open Learning Technologies at UBC

Archived Presentation available here

Speakers: Enej Bajgoric, Novak Rogic and Will Engle

Description:

Over the last several years, the Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology (CTLT) at UBC has developed open learning technologies that support e-Portfolios, course blogs, communities of practice, classroom backchannels and microblogging, open educational resource (OER) development, peer evaluation, and other learning and web-publishing needs. These open tools support online and blended learning inside and outside of classroom contexts; allow UBC to investigate how new technologies may be incorporated into learning environments in innovative and sustainable ways; and facilitate communication, engagement, collaboration and knowledge transfer. This session will provide an overview of the open tools and discuss how they are used at UBC to enhance active learning.

Speaker Bios:

Enej Bajgoric is an Applications Developer at CTLT and develops custom themes and plugins for its open publishing framework.

Novak Rogic is the CTLT Web Strategist and leads web projects that emphasize content sharing and republishing.

Will Engle is a Copyright and Learning Technologies Support Analyst and is interested in the impacts of copyright and technology on teaching and learning.

Beyond Walls: Teaching and Learning in the Open

Archived Presentation available here

Speakers: Dr. Jon Beasley Murray, David Kohler, Stephen Hay

Description:

Open education is based on a set of values that are shared by a wide range of scholarly practices: that knowledge should be free and open to use and re-use; that collaboration should be easier, not harder; that people should receive credit for contributing to teaching and learning; that concepts and ideas can be linked in unusual and surprising ways; and that learning should extend beyond institutional walls. One of the exciting and challenging elements about adopting open strategies in teaching and learning is the notion of exposing work and interacting with audiences outside of the traditional classroom. This session will feature different practitioners who have taken an open approach with teaching and learning projects. They will share their experiences, strategies, mistakes and successes regarding working in the open, collaborating with different audiences and moving learning beyond classroom walls.

Speaker Bios:

Jon Beasley-Murray is an Assistant Professor in Latin American Studies at UBC. He coordinated the educational project MurderMadnessandMayhem. In one semester three articles were promoted to FeaturedArticle status, eight toGoodArticle status and one to B-Class status. See also: “WasIntroducingWikipediatotheClassroomanActofMadnessLeadingOnlytoMayhemifnotMurder?

David Kohler has led a team at UBC’s Mathematics Department to develop hundreds of UBC-Wiki based course pages and resources, and an openexamresourcesdatabase. He is also an Instructional Skills Workshop facilitator and a recipient of the UBC Graduate Teaching Award 2009/2010, AMS Just Desserts Award 2012 and Mathematics Department Graduate Teaching Award 2012.

Stephen Hay is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at UBC. He is a Wikipedia Campus Ambassador for the Wikipedia Education Program, a project where students in Brazil, Canada, India, and the United States contribute to Wikipedia as part of their course work. Last year he was teaching assistant for Tina Loo’s North American Environmental History, a course where undergraduate students gave their work thousands of readers by writing for Wikipedia.

Uncovering the Impact Story of Open Research

Archived Presentation available here

Speaker: Heather Piwowar

Description:

Research today is often evaluated by the journal impact factor of a published article. This has left little room for innovation: it is difficult for new journals to achieve a high impact factor, and non-traditional research products are often published outside of journals. It has also failed to recognize and reward broad impact and post-publication use. As scholarly publishing and interactions move online, scholarly and public impacts are becoming easier to follow and measure. Heather Piwowar will talk about tools that can track these impacts today, and discuss how these tools are empowering revolutions in open access publishing and open data repositories.

Speaker Bio:

Heather Piwowar is co-founder of total-impact (http://totalimpact.org/) a new tool for evaluating impact metrics for research outputs. She is a postdoc research associate with Duke University and the University of British Columbia, funded through the DataONE project at the Dryad Digital Repository at NESCent. Heather is a leading researcher in the area of research data availability and data reuse. She wrote one of the first papers to measure thecitationbenefitofpubliclyavailableresearchdata, studiedpatternsinpublicdepositionofdatasets, and is currently investigatingpatternsofdatareuse and the impact of journal data-sharing policies. Piwowar is afrequentspeaker on research-data archiving, writes a well-respectedresearchblog and is active on Twitter (@researchremix). She has a bachelor’s and master’s degree from MIT in electrical engineering, 10 years of experience as a software engineer in small companies and a PhD in Biomedical Informatics from the University of Pittsburgh.