2013 Sessions

Open Robotics and 3D Printing Demo

Speaker: Jon Nakane and Students from the Engineering Physics Project Lab

Tuesday October 22nd, 2013; 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm (See the full schedule).

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Description:

Prototyping tools are available on campus for students looking to fabricate their ideas into physical objects. On display will be physical prototypes from UBC Engineering Physics and other local groups making use of waterjet cutters3d printerslaser cutters and other tools to put together physical prototypes for academic courses, capstone projects and extracurricular teams.

Speaker Bio:

Jon Nakane has been at UBC for more than 15 years – as an undergrad and grad student, and currently as the Lab Director of the Engineering Physics Project Lab at UBC. He supervises senior undergrad engineering projects involving electronics, mechanical and software solutions. He has access to some of the more interesting prototyping tools on campus, and has sponsored extra-curricular competition teams (UBC Snowstar, Electric Racing Team, UBC Rapid).

MOOCs and On-Campus Learning

Speaker: Gregor Kiczales

Wednesday October 23rd, 2013; 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm (See the full schedule).

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Description:

What will higher education become as the MOOC innovation era plays out?

Setting dire predictions aside it seems likely that students will have a vast range of resources for learning at their disposal. With MOOCs, MOORs, badge systems, learning communities and other innovations coming on line students will be able to get content delivery, active learning support, office hours and assessment from a variety of different sources. All of these will be available these at a wider range of price points and qualities than is possible today.

What do we do with our on-campus courses in this environment? How can we use these innovations to offer students a better education than ever before? What will it be like running courses that make extensive use of open online resources? What will open online courses be best at? Worst? What must we excel at?

These questions led us to develop a Coursera MOOC, which ran for the first time this summer. We are now offering that MOOC in parallel with an on-campus course, in a continued effort to understand the relative strengths of each modality. The talk will report on these experiences and present our current beliefs about the challenges ahead.

Speaker Bio:

Gregor Kiczales is a Professor in the Computer Science Department. His work is directed at enabling programmers to write programs that, as much as possible, look like their design. He is best known for his work on aspect-oriented programming, and he led the Xerox PARC team that developed aspect-oriented programming and AspectJ. He is a co-author of “The Art of the Metaobject Protocol” and was one of the designers of the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS). He is an ACM Fellow and the 2012 recipient of the Dahl-Nygaard Senior Prize for his achievements in programming language design research.  He is also the instructor for the Introduction to Systematic Program Design MOOC at Coursera.

Reclaiming the Open Learning Environment

Speakers: Brian Lamb, Jon Festinger, Will Engle

Wednesday October 23rd, 2013; 1:00 pm – 1:50 pm (See the full schedule).

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Description:

The delivery of open online learning has become a more common practice (or at least a more desired practice) in higher education in recent years. In this session, two diverse universities will share their lessons learned in delivering open learning. UBC has long embraced open learning projects through a robust WordPress and MediaWiki publishing framework that helped advance a broad range of open educational activities, including student produced OER and open courses. UBC’s embrace of both a self-maintained open infrastructure as well as emerging third party platforms is creating new potentials for open education at UBC. Meanwhile Thompson Rivers University (TRU) has an “Open Learning” division with a long history of providing open access post-secondary distance education (online and print) by offering continuous enrolment, flexible scheduling and minimal admission requirements, as well as extensive capacity for Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) and a well-established transfer credit system. It is working to enhance its capacity to support learning and public engagement via open platforms as well, via alignment with the Open Educational Resources university (OERu) and by working with UBC to adapt its MediaWiki and WordPress framework for its own needs.

This session will examine how institutions and instructors can provide open educational experiences and develop the required expertise, capacity and support systems. The co-faciliators of this session will identify sharable and extensible tools, approaches and means of cooperation that will allow educators and learners to shape their open learning experiences.

Speaker Bios:

Brian Lamb is the Director of Innovation Open Learning at Thompson Rivers University (TRU).  Brian moved on to TRU after more than a decade with UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, where he was a Strategist contributing to a wide range of new media, open education and sustainability education initiatives. He founded some of the earliest campus services for blogs and wikis in higher education. He’s been a Research Fellow at Utah State University’s Center for Open and Sustainable Learning (COSL), and a Visiting Researcher at Barcelona’s Open University of Catalonia. He mutters ill-tempered observations on his weblog: http://abject.ca/

Jon Festinger, Q.C. is a Vancouver, British Columbia based counsel and educator. A Faculty member at the Centre for Digital Media (http://thecdm.ca) Jon teaches Video Game Law in the Faculty of Law at the University of British Columbia (http://videogame.law.ubc.ca) where he has now taught as an Adjunct Professor for two decades, is the author of the first edition of “Video Game Law” published by LexisNexis in 2005, and co-author of the 2nd Edition published in 2012(http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/ca/catalog/booktemplate/productdetail.jsp?prodId=prd-cad-01004). As a graduate of McGill University’s Faculty of Law, Jon began his legal career in private practice, in turn becoming General Counsel of WIC Western International Communication, Senior Vice President of the CTV Television Network and Executive Vice President, Business & General Counsel of the Vancouver Canucks. Jon practices law through Festinger Law & Strategy, is Vice Chair of Ronald McDonald House British Columbia, City Opera Vancouver and the Simon Fraser University Foundation. Twitter: @gamebizlaw Xbox Gamertag: cdmjon

Will Engle is a strategist at UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology.  Will is engaged with open education initiatives that are leveraging emerging technologies, approaches, and pedagogies to support flexible and open learning. With a background in library science, Will is interested in understanding and supporting the removal of barriers that limit access to education, information, and knowledge.  He occasional posts at http://blogs.ubc.ca/open or @infology on twitter.

The Whys and Hows of Open: Transforming Learning Through Open Pedagogies and Practices

Speakers: Christina Hendricks and David Vogt

Wednesday October 23rd, 2013; 11:00 am – 11:50 am (See the full schedule).

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Description:

Open education can be understood as a collection of practices that utilize online technology to freely share knowledge and to increase access to learning. The creative act of designing an open course or project can also lead to new pedagogical approaches. This session will feature two UBC faculty members who are creating and participating in innovative open projects and courses, including:

  • M101 – a localized, open online course on mobile education that is designed as knowledge asset and professional network
  • Why Open? – a facilitated and collaborative course that explores the different meanings of open in various industries as well as the benefits and issues with open
  • #ooe13 – an open professional development course on educational technologies
  • DS106 – an open, online course on digital storytelling that is hosted by the University of Mary Washington and that is currently being offered as a “headless” version this term with volunteers in charge of facilitating particular weeks during the course
  • ETEC522, PHIL102, Arts One & More – on campus courses which are incorporating student blogs, wikis, backchannels and more

In addition to hearing their stories, the session will also explore the motivations, experiences, and challenges in embracing open. We will discuss the impact openness had on their pedagogy and use of technology as well as explore how to determine if these efforts are meeting the instructors goals and improving the student experience.

Speaker Bios:

Christina Hendricks is a Senior Instructor who regularly teaches both in Philosophy and in Arts One. While on sabbatical during the 2012-2013 academic year, she did research on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, particularly on the topics of peer feedback and assessment and learning communities such as Arts One. She also participated in several open online courses (some of them “MOOCs”), including ETMOOC (Educational Technology and Media MOOC: http://etmooc.org) and DS106 (Digital Storytelling 106: http://ds106.us). As a result of these experiences she got involved in planning and facilitating a couple of other open online courses, and has started to make her on-campus courses more open and available to others to view and possibly participate in.

David Vogt is Director of Digital Learning Projects for the UBC Faculty of Education and Director of Innovation Strategy for the UBC MAGIC Lab. He has maintained a career-long interest in harnessing the learning potentials within emerging technologies. His unusual trajectory as an academic, innovator and businessman provides a unique perspective on the future of learning. He is author and instructor of ETEC 522 Ventures in Learning Technology.

Open Freedoms / Open Practices

Speaker: Paul Stacey, Senior Project Manager, Creative Commons

Wednesday October 23rd, 2013; 10:00 am – 10:50 am (See the full schedule).

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Description:

Contemporary open education practices are based on free software and free culture movements. Join Paul Stacey from Creative Commons as he explores the extent to which Open Educational Resources, MOOC’s, open access, and other open education innovations are embodying and leveraging these movements. Add your ideas to Paul’s as he imagines the possibilities open freedoms and open practices bring to education for faculty, students, and institutions. This wide ranging session will show how open is affecting every aspect of the university’s core mission – teaching, research, data, infrastructure, and community. Open freedoms have a corresponding set of ethical practices. There is growing expectation in the digital age, where the cost of copying and distributing resources is close to zero, that public funds should result in public goods. Governments and funders are increasingly putting in place open policy that requires grantees to openly license research and curricula created with public funds. Join Paul as he explores the ways in which digital technologies and contemporary open education practices are affecting the economics and traditional business models of education. Is open a major transformation of education? Decide for yourself at this Open Freedoms / Open Practices event.

Speaker Bio:

With over 25 years as an educator in adult learning, Paul has delivered high-tech educational programs in the private and public sector around the world. AT BCcampus, Paul led initiatives to forward use of educational technology for online learning, development of open educational resources, and professional development services for educators across all of BC’s public post-secondary institutions. Now at Creative Commons Paul is working to support the build out of an education and culture commons around the world.

Live Webcast:

Open Textbook Workshop

Speaker: Mary Burgess, Director, Curriculum Services and Applied Research, BCcampus

Tuesday October 22nd, 2013; 1:00 pm – 1:50 pm (See the full schedule).

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Description:

In October 2012, the government of British Columbia announced its support for the creation of open textbooks for the 40 highest-impact first and second-year courses in the province’s public post-secondary system. This project has generated a lot of interest in open textbooks in general, the financial benefits they may have for students, and the impact such open educational resources may have on curriculum development and flexible pedagogies. This session will provide an overview of open textbooks and will specifically explore:

  • an update on the BC open text book project
  • individual faculty and institutional changes in practice
  • benefits and challenges of adopting an open textbook
  • options for finding, selecting, and building on existing open educational resources

We will also share experiences to gain insights into what we should be aware of when venturing into the use of OER, including a discussion of Creative Commons licensing.

Speaker Bio:

Mary is responsible for the portfolio of programs and services at BCcampus that includes open education programs, the Open Textbook program, professional learning and training programs, and applied research projects such as the remote web-based science labs (RWSL / NANSLO).

How Students Are Leading Open Access

Speakers: Joaquin Acevedo, Goldis Chami, Rowan Cockett, Colum Connolly, Jae-Yung Kwon

Wednesday October 23rd, 2013; 2:00 pm – 2:50 pm (See the full schedule).

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Description:

Students nationally and internationally are a major force in advocating for open access. Join five student leaders who will excite and inspire you about the impact of open access on your research and learning at UBC, Pecha Kucha style! Originally from the Japanese term chit chat, Pecha Kucha is a presentation style that allows each speaker 20 slides shown for 20 seconds each (total presentation time is 6 minutes and 40 seconds).

Speaker Bios:

Joaquin Acevedo
Joaquin Acevedo is the Vice-President, Finance for the AMS/Student Society of UBC Vancouver. He is a third year student in the Faculty of Science, in the Cognitive Systems: Brain & Cognition program.

Goldis Chami
Goldis Chami is an Internal Medicine resident at the University of British Columbia. She has been actively involved in advocacy to promote an open access policy at UBC, and in open access initiatives more broadly. She sits on the steering committee of the Right to Research Coalition.

Rowan Cockett
Rowan Cockett designs open-access web-based tools for geoscience education that have been used for teaching and learning around the world. In his spare time, he is a PhD student researching large-scale numerical simulation and optimization in geophysics.

Colum Connolly
Colum Connolly is the Vice President Academic and External of the Graduate Student Society of UBC Vancouver. He is also a 4th year PhD candidate in the Department of Medical Genetics.

Jae-Yung Kwon
Jae-Yung Kwon is a registered nurse, an author, and a graduate student in the school of nursing at UBC. He is currently editor-in-chief of the UBC nursing student journal.

Muzzles, Media Offices and Message Control

Speaker: Margaret Munro, Postmedia News

Tuesday October 22nd, 2013; 2:00 pm – 2:50 pm (See the full schedule).

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Description:

The open system that used to encourage and trust federal scientists to discuss their work has been replaced by a tightly controlled system that churns out “approved lines.” Margaret Munro’s stories exposing how the Harper government has muzzled and silenced its researchers have attracted national and international attention. Her talk will focus on Ottawa’s muzzles, media offices and message control.

Speaker Bio:

Margaret Munro is an award-winning science writer with Postmedia News, which reaches millions of Canadians through its chain of newspapers including the Ottawa Citizen, Vancouver Sun and Montreal Gazette. Margaret has been to the Arctic to write about global warming, to Cape Canaveral for space launches and to remote First Nations communities to report on devastating diabetes epidemics. She has also documented the remarkable change in federal communication policy.

Open Access Megajournals – Have They Changed Everything?

Speaker: Peter Binfield, Co-founder & Publisher of PeerJ

Opening Keynote. Tuesday October 22nd, 2013; 9:30 am – 10:50 am (See the full schedule).

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Description:

The Open Access ‘Megajournal’ (a class of journal defined by the success of PLOS ONE) is a reasonably recent phenomenon, but one that some observers believe is poised to change the publishing world very rapidly.

A megajournal is typically understood to be an online-only journal; covering a very broad subject area; selecting content based only on scientific and methodological soundness; and with a business model which allows each article to cover its own costs. With these attributes, megajournals are not limited in potential output and as such are able to grow commensurate with any growth in submissions. PLOS ONE pioneered this category of journal and is currently expected to publish in excess of 30,000 articles in 2013 alone – possibly approaching 3% of all STM articles published that year. Recognizing the success of this model, many other publishers (such as Nature, Springer, SAGE, BioONE, PeerJ, , BMJ, F1000 and so on) have launched similar journals and each of these publishers is seeing their megajournal grow in volume, month on month. In many ways, the growth of the megajournal has been one of the most visible successes of the open access movement.

Dr Peter Binfield, who led PLOS ONE for 4 years until mid-2012 and left PLOS to co-found PeerJ, has experienced the megajournal both from within PLOS ONE, and from the point of view of starting an entirely new megajournal (PeerJ). In this keynote Peter shares some of his insights about megajournals, how they operate, how they can succeed, and whether or not this new category of journal will truly revolutionize the publishing landscape.

Speaker Bio:

Pete has worked in the academic publishing world for almost 20 years. Since gaining a PhD in Optical Physics, he has held positions at Institute of Physics, Kluwer Academic, Springer, SAGE and most recently the Public Library of Science (PLOS). At PLOS he ran PLOS ONE, and developed it into the largest and most innovative journal in the world, publishing some 3% of the world’s literature at the time of his departure. During that time, he also championed the development of Article-Level Metrics and continues to advocate for this approach towards literature assessment.

Peter left PLOS to co-found Peer J Inc, alongside Jason Hoyt (previously of Mendeley). PeerJ, the journal, launched in Feb 2013 (with PeerJ PrePrints following in April 2013) and makes use of an Editorial Board of over 800 world class researchers, including 5 Nobel Laureates and several faculty from UBC. PeerJ provides researchers with a low cost lifetime membership (starting as low as $99) which gives them the lifetime rights to publish for free thereafter. PeerJ has been hailed as “a significant innovation” by Nature, and was named as one of the “Top 10 Tech Innovators or 2013 by the Chronicle of Higher Education” – the company aims to drive down the costs of open access publishing, whilst simultaneously raising the bar for innovation and functionality.

Live Webcast:

The Future? Open Online Courses and the Library

Speaker: Erin Fields

Tuesday October 22nd, 2013; 11:00 am – 11:50 am (See the full schedule).

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Description:

Open access to research has become a core goal of academic libraries. The growth of open access initiatives, such as digital repositories, supports a very democratic notion of openly accessible publicly funded research. However, transitioning the support of open access initiatives to courses (e.g. LOOCs, MOOCs, e.g.) has been received with mixed views by librarians. Using current examples of courses at UBC, this session will explore open online courses and the future of library practice in these environments. This session will draw on participants ideas and opinions to further develop the dialogue on this issue.

Speaker Bio:

Erin Fields is the Teaching and Learning Librarian at UBC Library with a focus on flexible learning environments. Her current work involves collaborating on a TLEF funded open online course and supporting the flexible learning initiative at UBC.