2014 Sessions

Debate: Are MOOCs Good for Higher Education?

Debate Speakers:

Angela Redish (moderator), Vice Provost and Associate Vice President Enrollment and Academic Facilities at the University of British Columbia
Jon Beasley-Murray, Associate Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of British Columbia
Gregor Kiczales, Professor of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia
Christina Hendricks, Senior Instructor in Philosophy and Arts One at the University of British Columbia

Wednesday, October 29, 2 to 2:50 P.M., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

Description:

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are subject to both hype and criticism. In 2012, the New York Times declared it was the year of MOOC, while critics branded 2013 as the year of the anti-MOOC. Today, the debate about the impact that MOOCs are having, and will have, on higher education continues and the topic of MOOCs often dominates conversations and questions about how changes in technologies, pedagogies, learning analytics, economics, student demographics, and open education will impact student learning. Many universities, including UBC, are experimenting with MOOCs in different ways – from trying to understand how to scale learning to how to best use MOOC resources on campus.
This session will explore different types of MOOCs, the possible role for MOOCs in higher education, and their benefits and drawbacks.

Speaker Bios.:

Angela Redish (moderator) is the University of British Columbia’s Vice Provost and Associate Vice President for Enrollment and Academic Facilities. Dr. Redish served as a professor in the Department of Economics in the Faculty of Arts at UBC for nearly 30 years. She received her PhD in Economics from the University of Western Ontario, and her subsequent research studied the evolution of the European and North American monetary and banking systems. She served as Special Adviser at the Bank of Canada in 2000-2001, and continues to be active in monetary policy debates. Her teaching has been mainly in the areas of economic history, monetary and macro-economies.

Jon Beasley-Murray is an Associate Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of British Columbia. He has taught a wide range of courses, from Spanish Language to Latin American literature surveys and seminars on topics ranging from “The Latin American Dictator Novel” to “Mexican Film.” His  use of Wikipedia in the classroom has led to press coverage in multiple languages across the globe.

Jon is a vocal critic of the current model of learning and assessment common in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), especially for the Humanities. He blogs at Posthegemony and is the author of Posthegemony: Political Theory and Latin America. His current book projects include “American Ruins,” on the significance of six ruined sites from Alberta, Canada, to Santiago de Chile. He is also working on a project on “The Latin American Multitude,” which traces the relationships between Caribbean piracy and the Spanish state, and indigenous insurgency and the discourse of Latin American independence.

Gregor Kiczales is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia. Most of his research has focused on programming language design and implementation. He is best known for his work on aspect-oriented programming, and he led the Xerox PARC team that developed aspect-oriented programming and AspectJ. He is a co-author of “The Art of the Metaobject Protocol” and was one of the designers of the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS).  He is also the instructor for the Introduction to Systematic Program Design MOOC at Coursera. His discussion of the benefits of MOOCs can be found on the Digital Learning blog.

Christina Hendricks is a Senior Instructor in Philosophy and Arts One at the University of British Columbia. While on sabbatical during the 2012-2013 academic year, she participated in a number of MOOCs, of different types. Ever since then she has used her MOOC participation as a form of professional development and a way to make connections with other teachers and researchers around the world. She has also been one of the co-facilitators for an open online course (not massive) at Peer 2 Peer University called“Why Open?”, and is a part of a project called Arts One Open that is opening up the Arts One program as much as possible to the public.

 

 

Flexible Learning: Enabling Greater Access to Learning at UBC

Panel Speakers:

Claudia Krebs, Senior Instructor in the Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences

Gwynaeth McIntyre, Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia

Jeff Miller, Senior Associate Director for Flexible Learning in the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at the University of British Columbia

Rosemary Redfield, Professor, Department of Zoology, the University of British Columbia

Janice Stewart, Chair, Undergraduate Programs and Undergraduate Advisor & Chair, Critical Studies in Sexuality (CSIS),
Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice, Faculty of Arts, University of British Columbia

Wednesday, October 29, 1 to 1:50 P.M., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

Description:

Open education can be understood as a collection of practices that utilize online technology to freely share knowledge and to increase access to learning. The creative act of designing an open course or project can also lead to new pedagogical approaches. In the fall of 2012, UBC began to develop a flexible learning strategy in order to respond to the opportunities and challenges presented by rapid advances in information and communication technologies, informed by the results of learning research and motivated by the objectives of improving student learning. One of the main goals of the flexible learning strategy, which underscores the importance of open education, is to enable greater access to learning at UBC. This session will provide an overview of how UBC’s on-campus flexible learning strategy is intersecting with different aspects of open education. The session will highlight flexible learning projects that are embracing open approaches and the impact that openness had on their pedagogical approaches and student learning experiences.

Speaker Bios.:

Claudia Krebs, Senior Instructor in the Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences

Gwynaeth McIntyre is a lecturer in the Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies. Her teaching and research focus on the political and religious history of the Greek and Roman worlds. She is especially interested in the spread of religious ideas throughout the Mediterranean and ideology and religion were used to secure and legitimize political power. Her involvement in digital humanities began back in the summer of 2013 when she responded to a request for a faculty liaison for a burgeoning digitization project. This very project, now known as From Stone to Screen, has benefited greatly through the generous support of the TLEF-FL funding scheme and it is the exciting new developments of this project about which she will present.

Jeff Miller is the Senior Associate Director for Flexible Learning in the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) at the University of British Columbia. The goals of this Initiative are to enhance educational outcomes for students, enable greater access to UBC learning, and improve university effectiveness through new learning methods.

Rosemary Redfield is a Professor of Zoology; she has been teaching introductory genetics to UBC students since 1993, and incorporating ‘flexible learning’ strategies since 1998 (although it wasn’t called that then). Her current projects are the UBC-sponsored Useful Genetics MOOC, taken by thousands of students worldwide, and a UBC-credit partner course called Genetics for Life.

Janice Stewart has a PhD from McGill University in English Literature. She teaches in the Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice program as well as in the Critical Studies in Sexuality program. Her interests include critical theory, gender theory, anti-racist work as well an interest in Modernist writers such as Virginia Woolf and Emily Carr. Currently she is working on a project Social Justice @UBC community mapping project that will provide students and instructors in multiple Arts and Education courses with a digitally networked environment that supports educationally significant collaborative research, networking, critical thinking, and multimedia literacy. Locative media offer a way of making visible hidden stories of place and belonging. Increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in the world today call for a much broader view of literacy. Technologies of community mapping and social justice work, positions students as knowledge creators. Flexible learning and community engagement provide a diverse group of undergraduate students a pedagogic infrastructure that will build core research and intercultural competencies.

Open Adventures in Educational Gaming – From Trading Cards, to Game Design Teacher Hackathons, to Role Playing our Global Future

Speaker: David Ng, Director of the Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory (AMBL) and Senior Instructor at the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia

Wednesday, October 29, 10 to 10:50 A.M., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

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Description:

The AMBL (the educational arm of the Michael Smith Laboratories) lab of late has been exploring the intersection between open philosophy and the education gaming space. This includes their crowdsourcing venture into biodiversity trading cards, an exploration of table top role playing in an undergraduate course, as well as efforts to embed high school teachers into the hackathon game design culture. Join David Ng as he shares his experience on these various facets of his lab’s work, and participate in a discussion of the benefits and pitfalls of such an approach.

Speaker Bio.:

David Ng is the Director of the Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory (AMBL) and Senior Instructor at the Michael Smith Laboratories at the University of British Columbia. He is also the creator of the open access, open source biodiversity trading card game Phylo.

The Future of Scholarly Publishing: How Open Access is Impacting the Publishing Landscape

Panel Speakers:

Lea Starr (moderator), Associate University Librarian with Research Services at University of British Columbia
Lauri Aesoph, Manager of Open Education at BCcampus
Michael Blades, Professor of Chemistry at the University of British Columbia
Margery Fee, Professor of Canadian Literature at the University of British Columbia
Sandra Mathison, Professor of Education at the University of British Columbia
Brian Owen, Associate University Librarian for Processing and Systems at Simon Fraser University Library
Melissa Pitts, Director of UBC Press

Tuesday, October 28, 2 to 3:30 P.M., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

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Description:

Lea Starr, UBC’s Associate University Librarian, will moderate a panel discussion exploring the impact of open access on the field of scholarly publishing, giving special consideration to academic libraries. The panel will feature experts from a variety of backgrounds including university presses and open education advocates, and begin to tie together diverse perspectives.

Speaker Bios.:

Lea Starr (moderator) is an Associate University Librarian with Research Services at University of British Columbia. In the past, she managed the Distance, Regional, and Open Learning Library (then called the Open Learning Agency Library) for Thompson Rivers University.

Lauri Aesoph is Manager of Open Education at BCcampus and is currently involved with the B.C. Open Textbook Project. Prior to her decade with BCcampus, she spent 15 years writing books and articles, acting as acquisitions editor for a professional journal, and training health care professionals in integrative medicine.

Lauri will give an update on the Open Textbook Project including the developing author guidelines based on the most recent phase: creating and adapting textbooks for the 40 highest enrolled first and second year subject areas in B.C.’s public post-secondary system.

Michael Blades is a Professor of Chemistry at the University of British Columbia. He also serves as the Editor-in-Chief for Applied Spectroscopy, a hybrid-Open Access journal.

Michael will provide a perspective on the challenges faced by small, non-profit publishers with the expansion of open access journals, and will discuss how his journal has coped. Furthermore, he will discuss the impact of marketplace forces and offer an opinion as to whether open access offers a way forward for small society publishers.

Margery Fee is a professor of English at the University of British Columbia and is also a member of the Scholarly Communications Steering Committee. Her interest in scholarly publishing comes from her role as the editor of Canadian Literature: A Quarterly of Criticism and Review. She is also a member of the UBC Press Publications Board. Her main research area is Indigenous Studies.

Margery’s talk will focus on how open access has removed sources of income for small humanities journals–subscriptions and royalties–and on various proposals to address this loss.

Sandra Mathison is a Professor of Education at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on educational evaluation and especially on the potential and limits of evaluation to support democratic ideals and promote justice in education. She is co-editor of Critical Education, an open access journal, a member of the Institute for Critical Education Studies, and former Editor-in-Chief of New Directions for Evaluation, published by the for profit Wiley & Sons.

Sandra will sketch out the issues around academic capitalism created when professional associations’ are complicit with for-profit publishers. She will discuss the opportunities open access publishing provides for free, unfettered sharing of knowledge, research findings, and policy analysis.

Brian Owen is the Associate University Librarian for Processing and Systems at Simon Fraser University Library. He is also an Associate with SFU’s Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing, SFU’s Master of Publishing Program, and the Managing Director for Public Knowledge Project.

Brian will discuss the impending OA policy announcements that are expected from the Tri-Councils (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC) this fall and elucidate some of the perceived challenges and benefits of the proposed OA scheme.

Melissa Pitts has been working in Canadian publishing for nearly twenty-five years and is the director of UBC Press. UBC Press is among the largest university presses in Canada, as well as its leading social sciences publisher. Melissa is also a member of the Scholarly Communications Steering Committee.

Melissa will present a brief overview of how Canadian university presses are responding to OA, some of the complexities that beset the discussion, and a few ideas for the future of OA in Canadian scholarly book publishing.

Demystifying APIs

Speaker: Alex Garnett, Digital Preservation and Data Curation Specialist at Simon Fraser University

Tuesday, October 28, 1 to 1:50 P.M., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

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Description:

When you hear people talking about how they’re getting data from this API or that API, do you ever thinking to yourself: “Well, I’m not a programmer per se, but people toss that word around like ‘dark, leafy greens’ or ‘neoliberalism’ these days, so how hard could it be, really?” Good news! The answer is “not very hard, and particularly not very hard if you noticed that I used nested-apostrophes-as-quote-marks in the first sentence of this abstract!”

This talk will provide a brief, hands-on overview of interacting with various APIs using a command-line terminal. No prior knowledge of programming is required; only a willingness to learn about fun things like shell scripts and HTTP methods and POSIX environments. In exchange, you’ll hopefully learn a thing or two about how people create Twitter clients and query databases and other useful ways of using the internet that don’t involve a web browser.

Speaker Bio.:

Alex Garnett is a Data and Digital Preservation Librarian at Simon Fraser University. In addition to maintaining SFU’s new Research Data Repository, he works with the Public Knowledge Project on Dataverse Network integration and article parsing and transformation functionality, and the university Archives on various delightful file format migration tasks.

Connecting the Dots: Open Access, Open Education and an Open Future

Speaker: Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education at Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

Opening Keynote. Tuesday, October 28, 9:30 to 10:50 A.M., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

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Description:

We live at a time of transition between two worlds — the disconnected, analog past and the wired, digital future. Nowhere is this transition more apparent than in higher education, where cutting-edge technologies regularly mix side by side with centuries-old traditions. Openness is about overcoming barriers and paradigms of the past to unleash the transformative power of freely and fully using information in today’s world. Considerable strides have already been made toward Open Access in the realm of scholarly and scientific research, with millions of papers now available online through Open Access journals or institutional repositories, and hundreds of institutions adopting self-archiving policies. The movement for open education is following suit, expanding the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) to hundreds of thousands of students and saving tens of millions dollars on textbooks. Open Access and OER are essential building blocks for a more open future, and they are stronger together. Nicole’s talk will connect the dots between the areas of overlap and common lessons learned from the movements for Open Access and Open Educational Resources, as well as identify strategies for moving toward a more open future in higher education.

Speaker Bio.:

Nicole Allen is the Director of Open Education at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).  She also currently chairs  the Steering Committee of the Open Policy Network. Her work focuses on public policy and engaging and supporting the library community. She worked for seven years at the Student Public Interest Research Groups, organizing grass roots campaigns around issues related to open educational resources.  This included a cross-country tour dubbed “The Textbook Rebellion,” resulting in 3,000 university professors signing a commitment to consider adopting open textbooks. Nicole is regarded as one of the leading experts on college textbooks costs. Nicole splits her time between her home in Providence, Rhode Island and SPARC’s headquarters in Washington D.C.

Ingrid Parent

Speaker: Ingrid Parent, University Librarian at the University of British Columbia

Tuesday, October 28, 9 to 9:30 A.M. (See the full schedule).

Description:

Opening Remarks

Speaker Bio.:

Ingrid Parent is the University Librarian at the University of British Columbia, where she is also Chair of the Scholarly Communications Steering Committee. Previously, she has been the Assistant Deputy Minister at Library and Archives Canada, where she co-lead the development of their Canadian Digital Information Strategy.

To Flex Your Learning or Not? Choices on this Evolving Spectrum and Some Implications for Educators

Speaker: Paul Cubbons, Instructor, Sauder School of Business, UBC

Wednesday, October 29, 3 to 3:50 p.m., Lillooet Room (301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (See the full schedule).

Description:

Flexible learning is all the rage. It’s got to be good hasn’t it? Flexibility sounds so desirable for busy students. But under the “flexible learning umbrella” there exists a spectrum of possibilities, from MOOCs to flipped classrooms, from online through blended to face-to-face, and from synchronous to asynchronous, self-paced and automated to scheduled and facilitated. This talk will focus on some of the work undertaken around flipped classroom enablement, and curating resources in a way that allows for multiple uses. Examples are drawn from the Flexible Learning supported project led by the Sauder School of Business, partnering with Entrepreneurship@ubc, CTLT and UBC Librarians.

Speaker Bio.:

Paul Cubbons spent 15 years in industry, primarily in consumer packaged goods marketing and innovation before beginning his academic career. At Sauder, Paul leads the Entrepreneurship group and is the business school’s partner with e@ubc in non-credit entrepreneurship programming. Paul is a winner of the Business School “Talking Stick” award for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching, and the Graduate Teaching Award for excellence in teaching to graduate students. Paul sits on the UBC-wide Flipped Lab steering committee and continues to experiment with flexible approaches to design and delivery of learning experiences. Learn more about Paul’s teaching and research here.